Category Archives: Wyoming

New Workshops / Tours Update! (dates approaching)

Field Photography Workshops / Tours

workshop sunrise, Lake Tahoe

NEW- February 22-24 Yosemite Semi-Private Tour – SOLD OUT
I will only take 4 people, offering us amazing camaraderie and teamwork. The intention is to enable you to experience the type of photography experience often reserved for my close friends and fellow pros. This will be a budget friendly trip with total immersion into the photographic experience, day and night. We will share in decision making, scouting and shooting. Weather, as always, dictates our shooting choices. This is the right time of year to capture the famous “fire fall” (conditions permitting). While I will be shooting with you, my main focus is your learning experience! You come first. I get us there, get us set up and answer EVERY question. I am working for you:)
Call me for specifics and to reserve your spot 530-545-2896.
Cost: only $479

Storm Light Tunnel View news

Grand Teton National Park Workshop / Tour Dates Set! (see flyer below)

Grand Tetons in the Spring, 2013:
June 20-23:
This will be a four day adventure focussing on iconic Teton landscape images, as well as wildlife photography (baby critters will be out and about). Along with putting us in the right place at the right time to capture our dream photos, I will be teaching about composition, exposure, light, perspective and proper technique. 100% of our time will be spent in the field, where we will learn while doing. While our days are long and tiring, they are also extremely rewarding both photographically and personally. Comeraderie is a huge part of our experience. We will have a great time in a world class wilderness environment and come away better photographers for it. This will be limited to a small number of participants so everyone has all the personal attention required to get the most out of the experience. This is not a physically demanding tour, but participants should be able to walk on uneven ground. You will be expected to rise early to start the day, and be considerate to the groups time requirements in order to ensure that we can meet our “magic light” timelines!  Please call to discuss any details that may help you make your decision.
Dates: June 20-23, 2013
Cost: $975
jonpaul@jonpaulgallery.com
530-544-4269
NEW Private Workshop Days available in both Grand Teton and Yellowstone!
I have added the option of private, one-on-one workshops, both before and after the official Grand Teton dates. I will offer these private sessions at the same price as my local private sessions!
Call to arrange your custom dates 530-545-2896.
Cost: only $500/day

Teton Workshop Flyer 2013 web

Winter in Lake Tahoe

I have left a large number of dates open and available for private one-on-one or small group workshops / tours here in Lake Tahoe (or wherever you would like). This is a beautiful time of year to photograph Lake Tahoe, aspen groves, rivers, waterfalls, ice patterns, mist, black & white, sunrises and sunsets. The sun is low in the sky, providing soft light and long shadows. We can generally shoot a little later in the morning, and earlier in the evening. Snow and ice provide a new look to the land, and very different opportunities for familiar subjects. Composition and metering, along with managing the cold and snowy conditions, however, become unfamiliar. Join me in the field and allow me to share my experience with you. Let’s create some unique images, while I help you gain confidence in the snow covered photographic world!
Cost: $750/day only $500/day

Spring in Lake Tahoe

Dates will be announced shortly! Private workshops / tours are still available!
This is the most popular time of year to photograph Lake Tahoe! A majority of my signature Lake Tahoe images were composed at this time of year.
Often the lake is calm, providing iconic clear water images, along with beautiful sunrise and sunset reflections. Waterfalls are rushing with snow melt, rivers are full, and there are still very few visitors. We have the place to ourselves! Honestly, this is the stuff photographers dreams are made of:) Please join me, as I share the most outstanding locations to photograph in this region, along with my knowledge and understanding of the art of landscape and wildlife photography. As one of the few successful gallery photographers in the country, I have a different approach to this art. I am not attempting to create huge volumes of work to fill magazine space. Nor am I attempting to produce “digital art” from mediocre images. I will share with you the simple steps and tools necessary to capture “the fine art of nature”, eliminating the intimidation factor of the digital world. All questions are answered, as we learn by doing. Let’s look through the lens together, create amazing images, and learn to become more successful photographers in the field.


Also posted in California, death valley, digital photography, Eastern Sierras, fine art, Grand Tetons, impressionist, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, light painting, Moose, Mountains, National Parks, oxbow bend, Panorama, photo techniques, Photo Tip, photo tour, photo workshop, Salt Flat, spring, Sunrise, Sunset, Tutorial, Uncategorized, western, wildlife photography, Winter Photography, Yellowstone, Yosemite Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Special Moments Transcend Mere “Picture Taking”

Spirit of Yellowstone

The Spirit of Yellowstone:
Yellowstone is a place that evokes great emotion in people who appreciate solitude in the wilderness. I happen to be one of those people. I arose early on my last Fall morning in Yellowstone and set out for a sunrise photo excursion. With cold temperatures at night, the Hayden Valley filled with mist from the steam rising off the Yellowstone River. With only the Bison and Elk sharing the valley, there was a  feeling of solitude and peace that permeated the air. I found this quiet bend in the river that offered a visual translation of the tranquility I experienced at this perfect moment in time. Everything appeared soft, yet powerful, as the hint of sunrise color filtered through the mist and cloud. This is a truly special image. It is also an example of the type of experience that moves me to share my vision the way I do. My purpose in using the large format film cameras is to remind myself that my work is not about immediacy and volume. I only take my camera out when I am truly moved by a scene in nature that evokes an emotion I feel is worthy of sharing. When I believe a scene, combined with the light and atmospheric conditions present, have the possibility of transporting my viewers to a special place (inside or out), I know I am going to create a special piece of art. There is meaning in what I do, and my methods dictate how that meaning is presented and the impact that presentation has on the viewer. This is where my motto, “Bringing Home the Fine Art of Nature” was born. I hope this new image, as well as my others, brings you that inner peace I feel in these magical places!

Photo Tip:
Ironically, the simplicity of this scene is what gives it such great impact. The simplicity creates the ambiance. Quite often we will try to add everything we can into a scene; a strong foreground, a fiery sky, etc. This type of scene, which is based upon atmospheric conditions, has just enough landscape structure to draw the viewer in, and let the imagination run wild. The eye is drawn in along the river, through the mist, and around the corner disappearing into the distance toward the brightest part of the scene, the rising sun. With the simple foreground, we are left to wonder what is hidden beyond the bend, where we really wish we could go. The lesson here is, less is often more. Don’t force a composition, but feel it. Let it happen. Compose, with the camera locked on the tripod, then whittle away at everything that is unnecessary. Eliminate distractions whenever possible.

Equipment Used:
Canham 5×7 Metal Field Camera, Canham 6×17 cm panoramic film back, Rodenstock Sironar-S 150mm lens, Singh-Ray 2 stop split ND Filter (soft gradation), Really Right Stuff BH-55 Ball Head, Gitzo Carbon Tripod, Fuji Provia RDPIII 100 Transparency Film.

Also posted in 617cm film, Back Light, digital photography, fine art, fog, forest, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, Mountains, National Parks, Panorama, panorama film, photo techniques, Photo Tip, reflection, Sunrise, Tutorial, Uncategorized, western, Winter Photography, Yellowstone Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The Joy of Sunrise!

Sunrise, Misty Reflection, The Oxbow

Sunrise is a special time for landscape photographers. We venture out into a dark world with great hope and expectation. The world is quiet and still, with most creatures (at least humans) still asleep, and the wind waiting to be pushed by the suns first warming rays. Often times it is quite cold, but we come prepared. To endure the lack of sleep, darkness and bitter temperatures is a small price to pay to witness the first glimmers of light on a new day. At times this is looked upon as sacrifice. However, for those of us that have experienced the new dawn in a spectacular, and perhaps remote wild location, this is food for our soul. The image a reminder of the feelings we experienced in that spiritual place.
I have continued to use large format film in the hopes of doing justice to these special moments and places. I hope to share  more than just an image, but to give you, my collectors, the ability to be in that place, at that time, so your life can also benefit from what nature has to offer, if I am willing to endure a little discomfort. Soul food. May it fill you up.

The Story
Sunrise at Oxbow Bend is a classic! The anticipation of waiting for the sun to rise to the east and illuminate Mount Moran, the Teton Range and the yellow aspens in the foreground is fantastic. However, on this Fall morning, Mother Nature shared a visual appetizer! I looked over my shoulder to the east and realized the show was starting early, and in the opposite direction. Fortunately, I had time to move my 4×5 setup, compose and focus in time to capture this incredible light show. The shape of the clouds, the mirrored reflection and the mist rising from the river were capped off by the pastel colors of sunrise. The depth of this image draws us in, as this location draws me back year after year. Enjoy the view!

Photo Tip:
Everyone loves a colorful sunrise reflected in a still body of water. It’s a classic type of scenic image. Depending on the physical conditions of the location, it can also be very challenging to create a solid exposure. Most often, the sky is lit with the best color before the sun actually rises above the horizon. This leaves us with a larger dynamic range (from highlight to shadows) that the film or digital sensor can’t  handle in one exposure. You either end up with accurately exposed sky and black foreground and mountains, or accurately exposed foreground and blown out / white sky. While many people choose to use HDR software or image blending to put together two or more exposures in the computer, I prefer the simplicity of using a split level ND filter. This filter enables you to hold back the amount of light entering the camera from the sky, reducing the dynamic range, and enabling you to capture the scene in one exposure.
In the example above, I used a 3-stop split ND filter with a soft gradation. I was then able to expose for the foreground (bushes and fall color in mist), giving me an exposure latitude easily handleable by my transparency film. The result is a very true exposure in which I held the highlight detail and pastel color in the clouds, along with retaining shadow detail and subtle fall colors through the mist in the middle of the scene. Another bonus; very little computer time and a clean image that can be printed to 48×65 inches!
NOTE: Many people use split filters or image blending / HDR  and forget the fact that reflections are always 1 stop darker that what they are reflecting. To keep a natural look to your image (albeit subtle), make sure the reflection is a little darker than the reflected subject. It’s all about the details!

Equipment Used:
Canham 5×7 Metal Field Camera, 4×5 reducing back, Caltar IIN (Rodenstock) 90mm lens, Singh Ray 3-stop soft gradation split ND filter, Gitzo Carbon Tripod, Really Right Stuff BH-55 Ball Head, Fuji Provia 100 4×5 inch Transparency Film.

Also posted in 4x5 film, digital photography, Fall color, fog, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, Mountains, National Parks, oxbow bend, photo techniques, Photo Tip, reflection, Sunrise, Tutorial, Uncategorized, western Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fall Photographic Workshop in Grand Teton National Park!

A Fall Photographic Adventure in Grand Teton National Park

Grand Tetons in the Fall, 2012: September 27-30.

This will be a four day adventure focussing on iconic Teton landscape images, as well as wildlife photography. Along with putting us in the right place at the right time to capture our dream photos, I will be teaching about composition, exposure, light, perspective and proper technique. 100% of our time will be spent in the field, where we will learn while doing. While our days are long and tiring, they are also extremely rewarding both photographically and personally. Comeraderie is a huge part of our experience. We will have a great time in a world class wilderness environment and come away better photographers for it. This will be limited to a small number of participants so everyone has all the personal attention required to get the most out of the experience.Please call to discuss any details that may help you make your decision.Please call the gallery directly to inquire! 530-544-4269

Also posted in 4x5 film, 617cm film, 8x10 film, aspen grove, Back Light, Barn, Bears, beaver pond, Bison, black and white, digital photography, Elk, Fall color, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, light painting, Moose, Mountains, National Parks, Panorama, panorama film, photo techniques, Photo Tip, Pine Forest, Ranch, reflection, Sunrise, Sunset, Twilight, Uncategorized, western, wildlife photography Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Bison Portrait- Simple Symbolism

 

Bison Portrait, Yellowstone National Park

Bison Portrait, Yellowstone National Park

Most of my images are produced using feeling and emotion. My strongest images “just felt right” when I took them. This image, a portrait of a lone Bison bull wandering the open grassland in Yellowstone National Park, had that feeling. I had just taught a seminar in Grand Teton National Park and chose to take a longer route home, giving myself the opportunity to spend an evening in West Yellowstone. I was glad to be in such a secluded location, I was glad to be alone with my thoughts and emotions, I was enjoying the simplicity of being away. When this Bison wandered along, solitary, powerful, just being, I felt priveledged to share that time with him. This portrait symbolizes the power it takes to be strong, self reliant, alone and in the wild. Our wild spaces, and the creatures that inhabit them, do more than just create a healthy balanced ecosystem (which is very important); they are symbols of the strength and power we have within us (or strive toward building in ourselves). We need these wild places and creatures to exist for more reasons than most people realize. I hope this image shares that strength with you.

Photo Tip: Photographing wildlife is exciting. It can bring great joy to our lives. Unfortunately, many people get caught up in the moment and don’t respect the animals they want to photograph, taking a “get the shot at all costs” approach. Animals have a hard enough time making a living without people interfering. Study their habits and the natural signals they give. If you are causing them to alter their behaviour, back off. Wait until the opportunity presents itself appropriately. Not only can the animals be harmed by our thoughtless behaviour, you might get what you deserve in the end. Be respectful, revel in the experience, be grateful that you can come back another day and do it again.

Equipment used: Nikon D300, Nikon 200-400 F4 AF VR lens, Nikon 1.4x teleconverter, Gitzo 1325 Carbon Tripod, Really Right Stuff BH-55 Ball Head. No camouflage was used in the making of this image! 🙂

Also posted in Bison, digital photography, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, photo techniques, Photo Tip, Sunset, Twilight, Uncategorized, western, wildlife photography, Yellowstone Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

One Evening in Yellowstone

Madison River Sunset Panorama, Yellowstone N.P.

After photographing my last sunrise in Grand Teton National Park this Fall, I quickly closed up my camper and headed for Yellowstone. I only had enough time to visit the Madison area for sunset before I started my journey home to Lake Tahoe. Fortunately, a storm rolled in and made my 1/2 day a real treat. After a torrential downpour, the sky began to clear and the last light of day created some peaceful magic.

The expansive nature of Yellowstone has me intrigued. In this scene, the meandering Madison River, complete with a glorious sunset reflection, is set off against the simplicity of Yellowstone’s grassland. The two geysers in the background remind me how unique this environment is. The storm clouds above, complete with sunset light, add a mood and power to the scene.  This new image is a reminder of the tranquility I find through the power of natural experiences. I hope this image enables you to, “Bring the Fine Art of Nature Home”. I am motivated to return this coming Spring. Let me know if you might like to join me.

This image is now available for purchase through the Jon Paul Gallery !

Photo Tip: When the weather gets really bad, be patient and stay out there! Quite often, the most dramatic light exists on the edges of storms. Especially when dealing with an expansive landscape, clouds and reflection can open up the image and add depth and perspective. So, when everyone else runs for cover, put on the Gore-Tex, cover your camera with a plastic bag and wait for the magic.

Equipment: Canham 5×7 metal field camera, Canham 6×17 cm panoramic roll film back, Rodenstock 150mm Sironar-S lens, Gitzo 1325 carbon tripod, Really Right Stuff BH-55 ball head, Fuji Provia 100 transparency film.

Also posted in Geyser, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, Mountains, National Parks, Panorama, photo techniques, Photo Tip, reflection, Sunset, Uncategorized, western, Yellowstone Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Black & White adds Drama and Mood

Moulton Barn Panorama Black & White

This image, taken along Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park, has as western a feel as one could ask for. While the image was “nice” in color, I knew it didn’t have that something special that I look for, especially in an iconic scene. The dramatic clouds, mottled light and vintage theme made this an obvious choice for black and white. The wide range of tones from pure white to deep black gave the punch I had envisioned. While it takes some practice to get a feel for tone v.s. color, the results are well worth the effort. Importantly, as a large format photographer, I make all of my choices relative to the final image I envision before clicking the shutter. This is good practice, and helps increase your chances of success. (Don’t have the attitude that you can “fix it” later!)

Photo Tip: Pre-visualize whether the scene you are composing will be strongest in color or black and white. At  that point you can use your judgement as to how to expose for the image, and whether to use different filters to prepare for the processing it may require. (ie-strongly polarizing an image to darken the sky in anticipation of greater contrast against white clouds in a black and white).

Also posted in Barn, black and white, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, Mountains, National Parks, Panorama, photo techniques, Photo Tip, reflection, Sunrise, Uncategorized, western Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Stay Open to Something Different!

Schwabacher's Beaver Pond Reflection

This is one of my favorite landscape images from my recent trip to Grand Teton National Park. I had a morning to myself during my Fall “shoot with the pro” field workshop, so I visited the iconic Schwabacher’s Landing. After the sunrise at the most popular spot fizzled, I wandered around and took advantage of the soft, mottled light that was produced by the encroaching storm clouds just 30 minutes into the day. The low sun at this time of year makes this possible. This beaver pond held a perfect mirror reflection. I was able to include a beaver hut, dramatic clouds , fall color, moody dead trees, and the dramatic peaks in the background. Normally this is a lot to include in one composition, but the reflection helped balance and calm the image. I captured the image on 4×5 inch transparency film, so the detail is amazing. As with most of my images, this composition has a real wow factor, but the viewer will be awed by the subtle details in a large gallery print. Another amazing experience that will endure the ages!

Photo Tip: During Fall and Spring, don’t disregard the soft light one hour after sunrise and one hour before sunset. Especially when combined with dramatic skies in these changing seasons, early and late light can be a nice compliment to colorful compositions. While dramatic alpenglow and sunrise/sunset colors are exciting, warm light can be more subtle and pleasing for fine art images that will hang in someone’s home. Take advantage of the magic hour at these times of year and you may be greatly rewarded!

Equipment: Canham 5×7 Metal Field Camera, 4×5 reducing back, Rodenstock 150mm APO Sironar-S lens, Gitzo 1325 Carbon Tirpod, Really Right Stuff BH-55 ball head, Fuji Velia 100F transparency film. Film scanned on a Hasselblad/Imacon 646 drum scanner.

Also posted in 4x5 film, beaver pond, Fall color, forest, Grand Tetons, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, Mountains, National Parks, photo techniques, Photo Tip, reflection, Sunrise, Uncategorized, western Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

“Whisper Sweet Nothings”

Whisper Sweet Nothings

This is one of my favorite wildlife images from my recent trip to Grand Teton National Park. I arrived a day early for my “shoot with the pro” workshop, and took a little time to scout the area and check conditions. I found this happy couple while hiking along the Gros Ventre River, and ended up spending the evening photographing their antics. Watching the courting rituals of moose is a lot of fun, and good for a laugh or two as well. While I captured several nice images of the bull and cow individually, I found this image of the two moose interacting the most engaging. I look forward to hanging a large print of this image in my gallery very soon!

Photo Tip: Successful wildlife photography requires good planning, being in the right place at the right time, a knowledge of the animals behaviours, and putting in your time. Often there is much waiting around and testing of patience. However, if you are diligent and remain prepared, your patience can be rewarded with that one special moment you have been hoping for. While the reward is great, the experience should also be appreciated. Respect the animals that you are observing. Don’t take the attitude of “get the shot at all costs”.  Observe, enjoy and appreciate the beauty of the experience while capturing images. It is hard for animals to make a living in the wild. Don’t make it more difficult than it has to be!

Equipment: Nikon D300, Nikon 200-400 F4 AF VR lens, Gitzo 1325 carbon tripod, Really Right Stuff BH-55 ball head.

Also posted in digital photography, Fall color, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Moose, National Parks, photo techniques, Photo Tip, Uncategorized, western, wildlife photography Tagged , , , , , , , , , , |

“SHOOT WITH THE PRO” Grand Teton Seminar

Oxbow Bend, Mount Moran and the Grand

So many gallery visitors and fellow photographers have asked me to guide them in Grand Teton National Park that I altered my Fall schedule to introduce this unique offering! COME SHOOT WITH THE PRO (that’s me) in one of the most stunning locations in the world. This is not a typical seminar. I will be using my experience and knowledge to pursue stunning new gallery images. I will welcome a total of only 4 individuals to join me on this professional excursion. I will put us in the most iconic locations at the right time of day, and with a little cooperation from Mother Nature, we will compose some amazing images. While we shoot together, I will answer your questions, share tips and help ensure your photographic success. After our sunrise landscape shoots, we will pursue wildlife such as Moose, Elk and Bison. During the day, we can choose to pursue more images (weather permitting), or learn from photo critiques on your laptop in camp. Join me at a beautiful campground, or rest in one of Jackson Hole’s hotels and meet me in the morning at our sunrise location. This promises to be an amazing experience. Join me!

This seminar/tour is being offered on relatively short notice. Please contact me ASAP.
530-544-4269 gallery       530-545-2896 cell     jonpaul@jonpaulgallery.com

We will meet/greet the afternoon/evening of September 28th. The morning of the 29th will be our first sunrise shoot.
We will be immersed in photography 24/7 through sunset on October 2nd. This makes a full four days of shooting, and living the photographic dream! Please call immediately for details and to reserve your spot.

Bison with Fall Color & Falling Snow

Also posted in 4x5 film, 8x10 film, Bears, Bison, digital photography, Elk, Fall color, forest, Grand Tetons, Jackson Hole, jon paul gallery, Landscape, large format, Moose, Mountains, National Parks, Panorama, photo techniques, Photo Tip, Sunrise, Sunset, Uncategorized Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |